Aretha Franklin

On Shania Twain's 'Life's About to Get Good,' We Have No Choice But to Take Her Word for It

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Shania Twain

There's something just so inherently delightful about the prospect of a brand-new Shania Twain single, from an upcoming brand-new Shania Twain album, in 2017. The last time Shania released an album, LeBron James had yet to even make his NBA debut, and after endless false-start rumors and reported delays, it was starting to look like she might not release another until well after he retired. It's not an exaggeration to say there's been no substitute for her barnstorming country-pop while she's been gone, either: No star to appear in her wake has matched her effortless charm, her global ambition and her absolute sledgehammer hooks.

This is all to say that "Life's About to Get Good," released Thursday (June 15) as the first taste from Now, due in September, didn't have to actually be all that good to still be a welcome presence in our lives, especially going into the warm-weather months. Luckily, it is anyway; a rollicking anthem of folk-pop perseverance with a gently throbbing pulse, a sing-along-by-song's-end chorus and an inscrutable, almost quacking hook on the verses that sounds like it should be marking a Naked and Famous song. It's marvelous, it's irresistible -- it's Come on Over-worthy, which 20 years later is still pretty much the highest compliment you can give to a song of its ilk.

It is also -- rather quietly -- completely devastating. If you don't know about the drama Twain has undergone in her personal life since she's been gone, a quick summary: She separated from superproducer husband Robert "Mutt" Lange after nearly 15 years of marriage, with Lange alleged to have been having an affair with Twain's best friend, Marie-Anne Thiébaud. Shania bounced back quickly, however, and within two years she was remarried -- to Frédéric Thiébaud, former husband of Marie-Anne. It's the kind of stuff that would've been deemed over-the-top even in a classic country song, and it's unignorable context when considering the alternately heartbreaking and heart-filling lyrics of of "Life's About to Get Good."

Despite the song's sunny sonic demeanor and Twain's unwavering delivery throughout, the verses are a pretty big downer from the opening lines: "I wasn’t just broken, I was shattered/ I trusted you so much, you were all that mattered." The second verse gets even more brutal: "The longer my tears fell, the wider the river/ It killed me that you'd give your life to be with her." And then the absolute killer at second verse's end, as the singer resolves to move on despite her wallowing instincts, declaring "It was time to forget you... for-e-ver." The pause before the final word and way she extends it to emphasize all three syllables sounds like she's still considering pulling it back at any second, and it's spine-tingling just to hear her reach the end of it.

But that's where the chorus comes in, and thank heaven. The refrain is such an instantly familiar affirmation that it threatens to overwhelm the nuance of the preceding verses, as Twain rhapsodizes (with sturdy backing-vocal support), "Life’s about joy/ Life's about pain/ It's all about forgiving and the will to walk away." She soldiers on with newfound determination: "I'm ready to be loved/ And love the way I should/ Life's about, life's about to get good." It keeps the song from ever becoming a drag -- Shania would never, not with a lead single -- but has just enough lived-and-learned bruising to steer clear of being pat, either.

And when it comes to the chorus... she would know, wouldn't she? It's always dangerous to read too much real life directly into pop music, but with a story like Twain's it's pretty hard not to, and the music and delivery sells both the hurt and the healing with such crackling alacrity that it almost seems insulting not to assume she knows exactly from what she speaks. It's exactly what fans would've asked for from a Shania comeback single, and it makes its title one of the year's most gleeful self-fulfilling prophecies.