Mariah Carey's 'Glitter' Sales Gain 8,374% in U.S. Thanks to #JusticeForGlitter Campaign

Dave Hogan/Mission Pictures/Getty Images
Mariah Carey photographed at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in London on Jan. 12, 2001. 

Thanks to a fan-driven social media campaign, Mariah Carey’s Glitter album surged 8,374 percent in U.S. album sales in the six days ending Nov. 14, according to preliminary sales reports to Nielsen Music.

In the last six days (Nov. 9-14), the album sold 3,000 copies -- up from a basically negligible figure in the previous six days (Nov. 3-8).

The surge in sales is owed to a fan awareness campaign that started on Nov. 9 with the hashtag #JusticeForGlitter. Through the hashtag’s use on Twitter, fans of Carey -- whose new album Caution arrives at midnight -- have been encouraging people to buy the album, which was released in 2001. The set, which also doubles as the soundtrack to the Carey's film of the same name, debuted and peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard 200 chart and has sold 661,000 copies in the U.S. through Nov. 8. According to a Twitter representative, there have been more than 37,000 tweets using the #JusticeForGlitter hashtag, through Nov. 15.

Notably, it appears Glitter will tally its biggest sales week since 2002. While there is still one day left in the current Nielsen tracking week (ending Nov. 15), the album’s 3,000 copies sold so far would garner its largest sales frame since at least February 2002.

Further, Glitter will likely re-enter Billboard’s Soundtracks chart dated Nov. 24. On the Nov. 17-dated tally -- which runs 25-positions deep -- the No. 25 title, The Little Mermaid, earned a little over 2,000 equivalent album units in the week ending Nov. 8. With 3,000 in album sales already in the bank for Glitter in the week ending Nov. 15, Glitter is likely to jump back onto the chart somewhere in the top 15. (Glitter spent three weeks at No. 1 on the Soundtracks chart in 2001.)


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