ABBA's Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits: 'Dancing Queen,' 'Take a Chance on Me' & More

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ABBA photographed in the 1970s.

Thirty-six years after ABBA's last hit on the Billboard Hot 100 ("The Visitors," in 1982), the legendary Swedish pop group announced Friday morning (April 27) that they're back in the studio, recording two new songs.

The quartet -- consisting of Agnetha Fältskog, Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Anni-Frid Lyngstad -- revealed in an Instagram post that the two new tracks will be featured in an NBC/BBC special slated to air in December. One of the songs, the group announced, is titled "I Still Have Faith in You."

ABBA has sent 20 songs onto the Hot 100 (all between 1974 and 1982), earning four top 10s among 14 top 40 hits. The group topped the tally in 1977 with its pop/disco classic "Dancing Queen."

ABBA has also landed 13 albums on the Billboard 200 (from 1974 to 2011), six of which reached the chart's top 40, led by The Album, which rose to No. 14, the act's best rank, in 1978.

In honor of the group's return to the studio, Billboard looks back at ABBA's top 10 biggest hits on the Hot 100.

10. "When All Is Said and Done"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 27 (chart dated March 13, 1982)

9. "The Name of the Game"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 12 (March 11, 1978)

8. "Knowing Me, Knowing You"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 14 (July 23, 1977)

7. "S.O.S."
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 15 (Nov. 8, 1975)

6. "I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 15 (May 1, 1976)

5. "Fernando"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 13 (Nov. 20, 1976)

4. "Waterloo"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 6 (Aug. 24, 1974)

3. "The Winner Takes It All"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 8 (March 14, 1981)

2. "Take a Chance on Me"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 3 (July 8, 1978)

1. "Dancing Queen"
Hot 100 Peak Position: No. 1 (for one week, April 9, 1977)

ABBA's Biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits chart is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, through the April 28, 2018, ranking. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.