This Week in Billboard Chart History: In 1988, 'Bad Medicine' Brought Good News for Bon Jovi

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Bon Jovi photographed in 1987. 

The song became the band's third of four Hot 100 No. 1s. Plus, remembering feats by Rod Stewart, Wham! & Destiny's Child.

Your weekly recap celebrating significant milestones from more than seven decades of Billboard chart history.

Nov. 13, 1976
Rod Stewart crowned the Billboard Hot 100 with his love song "Tonight's the Night (Gonna Be Alright)." The track led the list for eight weeks, marking his longest rule of four career toppers. He's currently on the Adult Contemporary chart with an update of his third No. 1, 1979's "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?," with the new version featuring DNCE.

Nov. 14, 1992
The Heights' "How Do You Talk to an Angel" ascended to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The theme from the Fox TV series outlasted the show: by the time the song reigned, The Heights had been cancelled. Thankfully, the melodic song lives on.

Nov. 15, 2014
Tove Lo topped the Pop Songs airplay chart for the first of two weeks with her debut hit, "Habits (Stay High)."

Nov. 16, 1996
Ginuwine trotted to the top of Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs with "Pony." A week later, the '90s classic reached its Billboard Hot 100 peak of No. 6.

Nov. 17, 1984
Jitterbug … Wham! danced to its first of three Billboard Hot 100 No. 1s with "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go."

Nov. 18, 2000
Destiny's Child began its longest Billboard Hot 100 reign, as "Independent Women Part I" spent its first of 11 weeks at No. 1.

Nov. 19, 1988
"Bad Medicine," the first single from Bon Jovi's album New Jersey, notched its first of two weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the band's third of four career leaders. Four more top 10s would follow from the set: "Born to Be My Baby" (No. 3); another No. 1, signature ballad "I'll Be There for You"; "Lay Your Hands on Me" (No. 7); and "Living in Sin" (No. 9).

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