Miley Cyrus' 10 Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits

Brian Bowen Smith 
Miley Cyrus photographed April 8, 2017 in Malibu. 

As Billboard’s current cover star Miley Cyrus prepares her next musical phase with new single “Malibu” (out May 11), let’s revisit her already impressive history on the Billboard Hot 100.

Cyrus first jumped onto the chart on Aug. 5, 2006, when “Who Said,” a tune credited to her Disney Channel alter-ego Hannah Montana, arrived at No. 92. The Hannah Montana franchise – in which Cyrus played a character named Miley Stewart, who secretly led a double life as pop star Hannah Montana – eventually sparked 20 Hot 100 entries, including the top 10 hit “He Could Be the One,” which reached No. 10 in 2009.

Montana aside, Cyrus made her Hot 100 entrance under her own name in 2007, when “G.N.O. (Girls Night Out)” debuted (and peaked) at No. 91. She quickly followed with her maiden top 40 effort, “Ready, Set, Don’t Go,” a duet with her father, Billy Ray Cyrus. The collaboration darted to No. 37 in February 2008.

After her top 40 breakthrough, Cyrus vaulted to the top 10 three months later with the No. 10-peaking “See You Again.” The tune marked the first of her eight top 10 visits to date, including the No. 1 “Wrecking Ball,” which topped the chart for three weeks in 2013. The song lands at No. 1 among Cyrus’ 10 biggest Hot 100 hits.

Check out the full list of the 10 biggest Miley Cyrus songs to date:

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1. Miley Cyrus - "Wrecking Ball"
Peak Position: No. 1 (three weeks)
Peak Date: Sept. 28, 2013

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2. Miley Cyrus - "Party in the U.S.A."
Peak Position: No. 2
Peak Date: Aug. 29, 2009

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M11SvDtPBhA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

3. Miley Cyrus - "We Can't Stop"
Peak Position: No. 2
Peak Date: Aug. 3, 2013

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LrUvu1mlWco" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

4. Miley Cyrus - "The Climb"
Peak Position: No. 4
Peak Date: May 2, 2009

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NG2zyeVRcbs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

5. Miley Cyrus - "See You Again"
Peak Position: No. 10
Peak Date: Aug. 3, 2008

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aJDC3Gg-F8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

6. Miley Cyrus - "23" (Mike WiLL Made-It featuring Miley Cyrus, Wiz Khalifa & Juicy J)
Peak Position: No. 11
Peak Date: Oct. 12, 2003

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bbEoRnaOIbs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

7. Miley Cyrus - "7 Things"
Peak Position: No. 9
Peak Date: July 26, 2008

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Hr0Wv5DJhuk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

8. Miley Cyrus - "Can't Be Tamed"
Peak Position: No. 8
Peak Date: June 5, 2010

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sjSG6z_13-Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

9. Miley Cyrus - "Adore You"
Peak Position: No. 21
Peak Date: March 1, 2014

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/W1tzURKYFNs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

10. Miley Cyrus - "Ready, Set, Don't Go" (Billy Ray Cyrus with Miley Cyrus)
Peak Position: No. 37
Peak Date: Feb. 16, 2008

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j83uGXpfo6w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Miley Cyrus’ Biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits chart is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, through the May 13, 2017, ranking. Miley Cyrus' songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.