Pixies Hit First Airplay Chart Since 1992 With 'Classic Masher'

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The Pixies

The lead single from new album "Head Carrier" debuts at No. 30 on Adult Alternative Songs.

It feels like the early '90s all over again, as Pixies grace a Billboard airplay chart for the first time since 1992.

"Classic Masher" debuts on the Adult Alternative Songs airplay chart (dated Nov. 12) at No. 30, marking the influential Boston act's first appearance on the chart (which began in January 1996). The track follows six entries that Pixies logged on the Alternative Songs chart, where they rose as high as No. 3 with "Here Comes Your Man" in July 1989. The new song marks the band's first Billboard airplay chart appearance since "Head On," which reached No. 6 on the Jan. 25, 1992-dated Alternative Songs chart.

WTMD Baltimore, KCSN Los Angeles, KCMP Minneapolis and WXRV Boston are among the leaders in plays for "Classic" so far.

In their original heyday, after forming in 1986, Pixies hit a high of No. 70 on the Billboard 200 with 1990's Bossanova. They disbanded after touring behind 1991's Trompe le Monde and frontman Black Francis went solo (as Frank Black), while bassist Kim Deal formed The Breeders, who hit No. 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1994 with "Cannonball."

Beyond Francis' and Deal's non-Pixies success in the years following the band's break, the act's only current member to appear on an airplay chart since 2000 (before "Classic Masher") is bassist Paz Lenchantin, who contributed strings to A Perfect Circle and played bass with Billy Corgan's Smashing Pumpkins side-project Zwan, which logged a No. 7 Alternative Songs hit in 2003 with "Honestly." However, Lenchantin didn't join Pixies until 2014.

Pixies reunited in 2004 (although Deal departed again in 2013) and released a new album, Indie Cindy, in 2014, scoring the band its best career Billboard 200 rank (No. 23; 10,000 sold, according to Nielsen Music). Head Carrier, the band's new album, bowed at No. 10 on Alternative Albums in October, selling 8,000 copies in its first week.