Chart Beat

The Supremes' Biggest Billboard Hits: 'Love Child,' 'Baby Love' & More

The Supremes
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

The Supremes photographed circa 1967.

Among the cavalcade of stars who contributed to Motown’s dominant 1960s decade, The Supremes stood out as just that: supreme. The group from Detroit’s Brewster-Douglass housing projects, whose best-known lineup was trio Florence Ballard, Diana Ross and Mary Wilson, joined the budding hometown record label in 1961 but languished for years after a series of underperforming records earned them the in-house nickname of the “no-hit Supremes.”

That changed in the summer of 1964, with the arrival of their first Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 single, “Where Did Our Love Go.” For the next few years, nearly everything was a hit. They immediately followed with “Baby Love,” which made them the first Motown act with multiple No. 1s, and when “Come See About Me,” “Stop! In the Name of Love” and “Back in My Arms Again” continued the trend, The Supremes became the first artist to post five consecutive No. 1 hits.

By the decade’s end, the trio, whose lineup by then had replaced Ballard with Cindy Birdsong, claimed 12 Hot 100 No. 1s, still the highest count by any American group. Ross departed as lead singer in early 1970, but The Supremes carried on. With new leader Jean Terrell, the group claimed two more top 10s – “Up the Ladder to the Roof” and “Stoned Love” before it disbanded in 1977.

Here’s a countdown of The Supremes’* greatest hits on the Billboard Hot 100.

25. “Everybody’s Got the Right to Love”
Peak Position: No. 21
Peak Date: Sept. 5, 1970

24. “Nathan Jones”
Peak Position: No. 16
Peak Date: June 19, 1971

23. “Floy Joy”
Peak Position: No. 16
Peak Date: March 11, 1972

22. “Nothing but Heartaches”
Peak Position: No. 11
Peak Date: Sept. 4, 1965

21. “River Deep – Mountain High,” with Four Tops
Peak Position: No. 14
Peak Date: Jan. 9, 1971

20. “I’m Livin’ in Shame”
Peak Position: No. 10
Peak Date: Feb. 22, 1969

19. “In and Out of Love”
Peak Position: No. 9
Peak Date: Dec. 9, 1967

18. “Love Is Like an Itching in My Heart”
Peak Position: No. 9
Peak Date: May 28, 1966

17. “Up the Ladder to the Roof”
Peak Position: No. 10
Peak Date: April 18, 1970

16. “My World Is Empty Without You”
Peak Position: No. 5
Peak Date: Feb. 19, 1966

15. “Stoned Love”
Peak Position: No. 7
Peak Date: Dec. 19, 1970

14. “Back in My Arms Again”
Peak Position: No. 1 (one week)
Peak Date: June 12, 1965

13. “The Happening”
Peak Position: No. 1 (one week)
Peak Date: May 13, 1967

12. “Reflections”
Peak Position: No. 2
Peak Date: Sept. 9, 1967

11. “Love Is Here and Now You’re Gone”
Peak Position: No. 1 (one week)
Peak Date: March 11, 1967

10. “I Hear a Symphony”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Nov. 20, 1965

9. “You Keep Me Hangin’ On”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Nov. 19, 1966

8. “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me,” with The Temptations
Peak Position: No. 2
Peak Date: Jan. 11, 1969

7. “You Can’t Hurry Love”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Sept. 10, 1966

6. “Stop! In the Name of Love”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: March 27, 1965

5. “Someday We’ll Be Together”
Peak Position: No. 1 (one week)
Peak Date: Dec. 27, 1969

4. “Come See About Me”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Dec. 19, 1964

3. “Where Did Our Love Go”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Aug. 22, 1964

2. “Baby Love”
Peak Position: No. 1 (four weeks)
Peak Date: Oct. 31, 1964

1. “Love Child”
Peak Position: No. 1 (two weeks)
Peak Date: Nov. 30, 1968

The Supremes’ biggest Billboard hits are based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100 chart. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.

*Note that, from the second half of 1967 until Diana Ross’ departure in January 1970, the act was billed as “Diana Ross & The Supremes.”