Ozzy Osbourne Ends Record 30-Year Break Between Hot 100 Top 10s Thanks to Post Malone

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Ozzy Osbourne visits the SiriusXM Studios on Dec. 11, 2014 in New York City. 

"Take What You Want" is Osbourne's first top 10 since his Lita Ford duet "Close My Eyes Forever" in 1989.

Iconic rocker Ozzy Osbourne makes history on the Billboard Hot 100 (dated Sept. 21), ending the longest break between top 10 hits in the chart's archives.

As previously reported, Osbourne debuts at No. 8 as featured, with Travis Scott, on Post Malone's "Take What You Want." The song marks Osbourne's first top 10 in more than 30 years.

The track appears on Post Malone's new LP Hollywood's Bleeding, which launches at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

Osbourne earns his second Hot 100 top 10 and ties his best rank: "Close My Eyes Forever," with Lita Ford, hit No. 8 in 1989.

The mark for the longest drought between Hot 100 top 10s was formerly held by Dobie Gray:

Longest Gaps Between Hot 100 Top 10s

Ozzy Osbourne, 30 years & three months
June 17, 1989, "Close My Eyes Forever" (duet with Lita Ford)
Sept. 21, 2019, "Take What You Want" (Post Malone feat. Osbourne & Travis Scott)

Dobie Gray, 30 years, two months & one week
May 26, 1973, "Drift Away"
Aug. 2, 2003, "Drift Away" (Uncle Kracker feat. Gray)

Paul McCartney, 29 years & two weeks
Feb. 8, 1986, "Spies Like Us"
Feb. 21, 2015, "FourFiveSeconds" (Rihanna & Kanye West & McCartney)

(McCartney continues to hold the record for the longest wait between Hot 100 top 10s among artists in lead roles on both bookending hits; in between his two songs noted above, he hit the top 10 in 1995-96 as part of The Beatles on "Free as a Bird.")

For further perspective on Osbourne's span between Hot 100 top 10s: The last time he was in the top 10 before this week, on June 17, 1989, his fellow artists on "Take" were not yet born. Scott was born in 1991 and Post Malone in 1995.

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