Africa's Biggest Streaming Platform Boomplay Signs Licensing Deal With Warner Music

Courtesy of Warner Music Group 
      

Boomplay, the leading music streaming and download service in Africa, has signed a licensing deal with Warner Music, bringing the label’s catalog to millions of music fans across the continent. 

Terms were not disclosed for the multi-year deal, which will see more than one million Warner songs made available to Boomplay’s users in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Owned by China-based Transsnet Music Limited, Boomplay (formally known as Boom Player) was founded in 2015 and has quickly established itself as the most popular streaming service in Africa. As of February 2019, the platform boasts 42 million users, although doesn’t disclose subscriber numbers.

In November, Universal became the first major to partner with Boomplay. The addition of Warner repertoire to its catalog grows the number of songs on Boomplay up to five million, spanning local and international acts.  

Boomplay users can stream songs and videos online free of charge or sign up to one of the platform’s daily, weekly or monthly subscription plans. 

“Major deals with internationally recognized partners such as Warner Music continue to push us closer to our aim of building the largest and the most reliable online music distribution platform in Africa,” said Boomplay CEO Joe He in a statement. 

“We want every music lover in the region to be able to access any song or video, anytime and wherever they are.  We are looking forward to a successful partnership and business continuation with WMG in what are truly exciting times for the African Music Industry,” He went on to say. 

Warner Music EVP, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa Alfonso Perez-Soto said partnering with Boomplay was an unmissable opportunity “for our artists to make a whole new legion of fans.”

“The streaming service already has tremendous reach across the continent, yet they continue to expand exponentially,” added Perez-Soto, thanking Warner Music execs Charlie White, Marc Latilla and Reni Adadevoh for helping get the deal “over the line.”