Twitter Permanently Bans Alex Jones, Infowars Over 'Abusive Behavior'

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Alex Jones of InfoWars talks to reporters outside a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing concerning foreign influence operations' use of social media platforms, on Capitol Hill, Sept. 5, 2018 in Washington, D.C. 

Earlier this month, Twitter temporarily limited Jones' account but did not fully ban him from the platform.

Twitter has banned alt-right personality Alex Jones and his Infowars website for violating its "abusive behavior" policy, the company announced Thursday.

Twitter was one of the few social media sites that did not kick Jones off its platform last month. At the time, the company said he had not violated its policies but would take action if he did. And it did temporarily limit his account in August after he violated the company's rules against abusive behavior. 

This time, the company announced via its Twitter Safety account that Jones will be permanently suspended from Twitter and Periscope. "We took this action based on new reports of tweets and videos posted yesterday that violate our abusive behavior policy, in addition to the accounts' past violations," the company wrote. 

On Wednesday, videos surfaced of Jones accosting CNN reporter Oliver Darcy during the congressional testimony of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. Jones live-streamed the incident via Periscope. 

In its statement, Twitter acknowledged that it does "not typically comment on enforcement actions we take against individual accounts, for their privacy" but that it "wanted to be open about this action given the broad interest in this case." 

In early August, Apple decided to remove several Infowars podcasts from its feed over hate speech, a move that caused a crackdown among other social media and content platforms, including Facebook, YouTube and Spotify. Twitter was one of the few companies that didn't take action against Jones at that time. Since then, Dorsey has given several interviews explaining the decision. "If we succumb and simply react to outside pressure, rather than straightforward principles we enforce (and evolve) impartially regardless of political viewpoints, we become a service that's constructed by our personal views that can swing in any direction. That's not us," he tweeted Aug. 7.  

This article was originally published by The Hollywood Reporter