Spotify, Berklee & Electric Lady Studios Launch EQL Studio Residency Program for Female Producers, Engineers

Chesnot/Getty Images
Spotify is displayed on the screen of an iPhone on Jan. 6, 2017 in Paris.

Spotify, in partnership with Berklee College of Music and Electric Lady Studios, has announced that it will be launching the Equal (EQL) Studio Residency Program for emerging female producers and engineers.

​The program, which will begin on Oct. 1, will offer residencies in three different cities: New York, Nashville and London. During these paid six-month residencies, one participant in each city will work hands-on in Spotify’s studios and gain access to invaluable networking and mentoring opportunities to further their career.

"Women are underrepresented as artists, songwriters, engineers and producers,” said Kerry Steib, director of cultural impact, Spotify. “We have to use our resources to create opportunities to address this, and do it with great partners across the industry. This is just the beginning.”

Darla Hanley, dean of the professional education division at Berklee, added: "This exciting collaboration recognizes the many contributions women make in the music industry. We are happy to support and mentor the recipients of the EQL Studio Residency and look forward to sharing our expertise and many decades of combined experience across all corners of the industry with them.”

“Electric Lady is thrilled to partner with Spotify's EQL Studio Residency alongside Berklee College of Music in encouragement of more women in audio production," said Lee Foster, partner and general manager, Electric Lady. "We are strong supporters of this movement and look forward to meeting the next generation of women engineers and producers.”

Applications are now live for the program and close at 5 p.m. EST on Aug. 24. Apply here for Nashville, New York and London.


THE BILLBOARD BIZ
SUBSCRIBER EXPERIENCE

The Biz premium subscriber content has moved to Billboard.com/business.


To simplify subscriber access, we have temporarily disabled the password requirement.