The 2019 Grammys

Music Selfie App Eyegroove Shuts Down, Staff Moves to Facebook

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People use a selfie stick to take a group photo.

Eyegroove, the "musical selfie" app that helped users make short, high-quality music videos from their smartphones, has shut down after Facebook completed an "acqui-hire" of its staff. In a post announcing the move, CEO Scott Snibbe said he launched the app two years ago to "empower mobile video creativity" and thanked users who "brought us inspiration, laughter, tears, and fits of joy."

According to reports, Facebook did not actually buy the San Francisco startup or its technology, but has instead hired the bulk of its staff to work on a variety of projects. In his note, Snibbe explained that "much of our small team will be joining Facebook to work on new experiences for people to create, share, and connect."

Before it was removed from the App Store, Eyegroove described itself as a place to "add high quality effects and music to anything in your camera roll." Users could make, share and discover videos -- called "Grooves" -- and connect with other creators through its social network. Eyegroove worked with SoundCloud to provide licensed recordings to the videos, which could run 19 seconds.

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In a 2014 interview with Wondering Sound (RIP), Snibbe said he imagined Eyegroove as an "Instagram for interactive music." It was backed to the tune of $3.55 million in seed funding from a range of angel investors including John Maeda, Matt Papakipos, Roger McNamee, Amarjit Gil, and Bill McLean, according to CrunchBase.

Despite getting in on the #selfie game early, Eyegroove was unable to match the surging popularity of other similar video apps, including Dubsmash and Musical.ly, which recently rounded up $100 million in funding at a $500 million valuation.