Aimee Mann Drops Lawsuit Against MediaNet

Jeff Barclay/Music Pics/Rex/REX USA
Aimee Mann performs at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Jan. 28, 2013.

Singer-songwriter Aimee Mann has settled her multimillion-dollar lawsuit against B2B digital music service provider MediaNet. Mann sued the company in 2013, claiming they were distributing 120 of her songs on an expired license agreement.

"MediaNet and I have resolved our differences, and I feel confident that they are making every effort to license their content correctly in a way that protects the rights of artists and songwriters," Mann said in a statement. "I've therefore agreed to put my music back on their service."

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In her original complaint, the "Save Me" singer claimed she had signed a three-year license agreement with MediaNet in 2003 but opted to let it expire. A provision in her deal called for automatic two-year extensions, but she said her lawyers had sent a termination notice to prevent this. Mann's lawyers argued that the auto-renewal provision was unenforceable and that the suit was a "call to other artists to… put an end to the unlicensed, uncompensated use of their music by online services."

Mann, whose work on the film Magnolia earned her an Oscar nomination, had been seeking as much $18 million in statutory damages. Though its terms were not disclosed, the settlement was filed in Los Angeles federal court on Monday. City News Service first reported the settlement.

Launched in 2001, MediaNet has a catalog of more than 25 million songs and thousands of videos that it distributes to various music services. It works with the three major labels and dozens of independents -- its website lists Mann's SuperEgo label as a partner.

MediaNet CEO Frank Johnson applauded the return of Mann's music to the service. "Music rights are at the heart of our business, and we take the proper tracking and royalty payments to copyright holders very seriously," he said.