New Cal. Law ID's File Sharers

California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is pumping up efforts to track down illegal file sharers.

NEW YORK -- California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is pumping up efforts to track down illegal file sharers.

Schwarzenegger signed a new bill Sept. 21 that makes it a crime for anyone in the state to "knowingly" transmit commercial music or audiovisual works over the Internet to more than 10 people without including a valid e-mail address and the work's title. The law does not apply to "immediate" family members or anyone who has the permission of the copyright owner.

Violators are punishable by fines, imprisonment up to one year or both.

"We are grateful that Gov. Schwarzenegger has championed and now signed this landmark legislation into law," said Motion Picture Assn. of America president/CEO Dan Glickman in a statement. "He has a unique understanding of the powerful impact of piracy on the lives of thousands who make their living in the entertainment industry."

The legislation was patterned after existing Cal. law that attempts to stem counterfeiting. Anyone who sells or rents recordings or audiovisual work must include the "true name and address" of the manufacturer and the name of the author or artist.

The new law goes into effect Jan. 1.

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