IIPA Takes Action Against China's Copyright Pirates

U.S. music, movie and software industries called for the first time Feb. 9 for the United States to begin legal action against China at the World Trade Organization to stop widespread piracy that they

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Reuters) -- U.S. music, movie and software industries called for the first time Feb. 9 for the United States to begin legal action against China at the World Trade Organization to stop widespread piracy that they said cost them at least $2.5 billion in 2004.

In a formal filing to the U.S. Trade Representative's Office, the International Intellectual Property Alliance said the Bush administration should ask China for immediate consultations on the issue at the WTO.

That would be a first step toward asking for a WTO panel to rule on whether China was meeting its commitments to stamp out piracy. The move reflects growing frustration that promises made by Chinese Vice Premier Wu Yi and other top officials have not made a significant dent in piracy. U.S. industry estimates that about 90% of U.S.-produced music, movies and software sold in China is pirated.


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