Energy and Commerce Committee

  1. Legislation Ending Analog Approved

    February 01, 2006 12:00 AM EST Awaits the signature of President Bush. The U.S. House of Representatives gave final approval today (Feb. 1) to bring television into the digital age. The legislation was crafted by the Energy and Commerce Committee under the chairmanship of U.S. ...

  2. House Committee Passes Indecency Bill

    February 15, 2005 12:00 AM EST Indecency legislation that would authorize $500,000 fines for broadcast licensees and performers, as well as license-revocation hearings for repeat violators, gained momentum in the House Feb. 8. WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Indecency legislation that woul ...

  3. House Committee Passes Indecency Bill

    February 09, 2005 12:00 AM EST NAB, RIAA fight proposed fine for 'individuals.' Indecency legislation that would authorize $500,000 fines for broadcast licensees and performers, as well as license-revocation hearings for repeat violators, gained momentum in the House ...

  4. Lawmakers OK Indecency Bill

    October 06, 2004 12:00 AM EDT Legislation sets highest fines ever. Federal lawmakers have agreed on a provision that would establish the highest fines ever for broadcasters who violate the Federal Communications Commission standards for indecency. The top fine would be $500,00 ...

  5. Boucher Bill Raises Ire At House Judiciary Committee

    June 28, 2004 12:00 AM EDT A public shouting match, the likes of which is seldom seen here, is going on between two House of Representatives committees that are of importance to content holders and users. WASHINGTON -- A public shouting match, the likes of which is seldom s ...

  6. Hatch's Induce Act Targets P2P Services

    June 28, 2004 12:00 AM EDT Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, introduced a late-session bill June 22 that would allow artists and labels to sue peer-to-peer companies that profit from e Hatch's Induce Act Targets P2P Services C ...

  7. Copy-Protection Bill Raises Ire In House

    June 24, 2004 12:00 AM EDT In an extraordinary move, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee and two Judiciary copyright subcommittee leaders have publicly come out in opposition to a bill introduced by a committee member In an extraordinary move, the chairman of the ...