-- Turns out Live Nation doesn’t need to merge with Ticketmaster to offer new and creative bundles to increase attendance at concerts, one of the stated benefits of a merged company. Today the concert promoter announced the “first ever” one-price concert package that includes a lawn seat, parking, all fees, a hot dog and a soda for $29.99. The offer is good only on Wednesday, July 8.

The one-price bundle addresses the issue of transparency. Earlier in the summer, Live Nation dropped all services fees from some lawn seat ticket sales. But some tickets include facility fees, and parking tends to cost extra. The public reacted strongly to the discounted offers. Judging from articles and blog comments, some people felt parking should have been included. And the public’s distaste for fees of any kind is well documented. So rather than get a $15 ticket with $15 in fees, for example, the public is going to be far happier with a $30 ticket that does not break out the various components of the price. (Press release)

-- The House of Blues in Boston may have its alcohol licensed suspended up to one week. The venue had two incidents of underage drinking in which the minors ended up in the hospital with alcohol poisoning. The Boston Licensing Board voted for a four-day and a three-day suspension. The venue, owned by Live Nation, has five days to appeal once the reasons for the suspensions are received. (Boston Herald)

-- The Tennessee Performing Arts Center, which is comprised of four venues in Nashville, has ended its relationship with Ticketmaster and has begun selling tickets using its own custom-made platform. There’s more symbolism than financial impact in this news. Ticketmaster will hardly notice the lost revenue. But it shows there are viable options to doing business with the industry giant. (TicketNews)

-- A profile of Brooklyn Bowl, a new venue/bowling alley in the Willliamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn. The venue is the creation of Peter Shapiro and Charley Ryan , the owner and operator the the late Wetlands Preserve club in Manhattan. (Brooklyn Vegan)

-- A look at the new Imeem store that sells MP3 downloads directly and through affiliates iTunes and Amazon.com. The big experiment here is not just selling downloads directly, it’s finding a way to incent download purchases in an environment built for free streaming. It’s no coincidence the most popular download stores do not offer free streaming. They concentrate on selling music. (TechCrunch)

-- Why Joel Tenenbaum is up a creek, the brief version: “(P)utting aside the merits of the case (which I believe strongly favor the plaintiffs) it's going to be a huge challenge for them just to handle the volume of work they're about to encounter.” (Copyrights & Campaigns)

-- A paper looks for reasons affecting Finnish file sharing. “Frequent users are clearly more often male than female, are younger, and possess lower educational qualifications than infrequent users. The results also indicate that the people who are active in P2P-users have weaker legal knowledge about digital copyright issues. The findings and the use of the survey method carry implications for legal and social science scholar work that examines the illegal file-sharing phenomenon.” (SSRN)

-- Nokia says one out of three Comes With Music customers – whatever number that is – downloaded at least one Michael Jackson song last week. In Mexico, 25% of all downloaded tracks were by Jackson. (Music Ally)

-- More Jackson traffic: An AT&T internal memo says traffic on June 25, after Michael Jackson’s death, resulted in 65,000 messages sent per second – more than events like “American Idol” or New Year’s Eve. (MacDailyNews)

-- Sony’s efforts to sell its catalog go well beyond eMusic in the U.S. In Thailand, the company has sold over 750,000 compilation CDs at 7-11 stores. In Malaysia, Sony is selling 10 different CDs with 50 catalog MP3s at night market and shopping center stalls. (The Star)

-- Non-traditional retail can still work – regardless of Starbucks’ ever-changing involvement with music. Cracker Barrel has sold 58,000 copies of its Montgomery Gentry release, “For Our Heroes,” since its release on Memorial Day. The 12-song compilation has one new song, four rarities and two hits. Music sales accounted for 2% of the restaurant chain’s 2008 revenues. Cracker Barrel has 588 locations around the country. (Nashville Post)