Fast-growing independent ticketing company Ticketfly has secured $3 million in Series A funding, and is on track to sell 1 million tickets this year, according to the company. Investors include High Peaks Venture Partners, Contour Venture Partners, the NYC Seed Fund, and notable angel investors including Howard Lindzon, co-founder and CEO of Stocktwits, and Roger Ehrenberg, managing partner of IA Venture Partners.

Ticketfly says it will use this round of investment to build out its social marketing platform to serve venues and promoters, and to expand its footprint.

"The social web presents a watershed moment for the live event business [and] an enormous opportunity to maximize ticket sales and engage a highly-qualified audience,” Andrew Dreskin, co-founder and co-CEO of Ticketfly, tells Billboard.biz. “This round of funding will allow us to continue to drive innovation, everything from rewarding tastemakers for helping to spread the word to mobile ticket delivery.”

Founded in 2008, the Ticketfly integrated ticketing business model makes use of social websites as marketing platforms and taps consumers to spread the word about concerts and events. New Ticketfly clients include Guerilla Union, the producer of the Rock the Bells Tour; the Troubadour in West Hollywood, Calif., the Glass House in Pomona, Calif., the Key Club in West Hollywood, the Rickshaw Stop in San Francisco, Maxwell’s in Hoboken, N.J., the Social in Orlando, Fla., R5 Productions in Philadelphia, and Elko Concerts in Pittsburgh. Existing clients include the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C., and the 18,500-capacity Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Md.

Merriweather was a noteworthy addition to the Ticketfly roster in that it was the first large venue to switch from Ticketmaster to another ticketing company in the wake of the DOJ’s approval of the Live Nation/Ticketmaster merger (Billboard.biz, Feb.18). Asked at the time if the merger’s approval had anything to do with Merriweather going with Ticketfly, Seth Hurwitz, president of Merriweather operator I.M.P., told Billboard.biz, “No question about it. I was happy with Ticketmaster, but I can’t have my competitor selling my tickets. It’s just not going to happen.”

Ticketfly says its customers see 30%-40% lower service fees on average than does Ticketmaster’s, including no fees for printing at home.