- EMI has launched Your Soundcheck, "an exclusive online research community of people with a passion for music." It appears to be a continuation of the mission to learn about consumer behavior that was started with the consumer-facing EMI.com. Hopeful registrants are taken through a five-minute questionnaire. (Your registration will be denied as soon as you indicate you work in the music industry.) What will be learned from Your Soundcheck that could not be gleaned from the various Web sites of EMI artists, conversations with technology partners or expensive market research reports? Perhaps how valuable consumers email addresses are to direct marketing. (Your Soundcheck)

- A familiar refrain: digital site losing money, artists demand better royalties. In this case, the site is YouTube (estimated 2009 loss: $470 million) and the artist is singer-songwriter Billy Bragg. (Digital Music News)

- Echo Park in Los Angeles has a new record store, Origami Vinyl. Vinyl-only stores are becoming more commonplace. Sales continue to increase and LPs offer better margins than do CDs. For the first three months of 2009, vinyl sales are up nearly 55% according to Nielsen Soundscan. (LAist)

- David Harrell, who writes the excellent Digital Audio Insider blog, was interviewed by Fingertips about digital music, being an artist in the Internet era, etc. An excerpt: "I'm not arguing that musicians don't deserve a living wage, but it's a simple fact that--and this is the case with any creative field--you have more talented people than the market for their collective talent can reasonably support. And you've got more of them every day, as it's easy for anyone to release music today, even if it's just putting some songs up on MySpace. The result is more and more competition, not just for the dollars of music fans but for their time and attention." (Fingertips)

- Regional Mexican artists are having success with mobile phones. "In the Anglo market the majority of digital sales take place online; in regional Mexican music an estimated 85 percent of digital music is purchased on cellphones." (New York Times)

- MicroMu is a Chinese Web site that promotes concerts by local independent artists and posts live recordings that are free to consumers. The artists get a share of the advertising revenue. (Beijing Review)

- A broad coalition - some of its its members usually sit on the same side of digital rights issues - is urging President Obama to appoint "policymakers who will protect new tools and new artistic works" and create new positions at the Patent and Trademark Office, the United States Trade Representative and the Department of State. The coalition includes the Electronic Frontier Federation, Consumer Electronics Association, the American Library Association, and the Wikimedia Foundation. (Press release)

- Nearly half of Canadians polled by the Angus Reid Global Monitor believe secondary ticketing service TicketsNow should be closed because they believe Ticketmaster is using the site to overcharge fans. (Ticket News)