As Justin Timberlake’s “The 20/20 Experience” (RCA/Sony Music Entertainment) held off Depeche Mode’s “Delta Machine” (Columbia/Sony) for a second week atop the U.K. album chart, TV presenters Ant & Dec re-entered the singles chart at No. 1 in their former recording guise of PJ & Duncan, with their 1994 top ten hit “Let’s Get Ready To Rhumble” (Edsel). But the week’s biggest seller was the new No. 1 on the compilation chart, “Now That’s What I Call Music! 84” (EMI TV/UMTV/Universal), with close to 262,000 sales.
 
Timberlake’s album sold another 56,000 units last week, according to Official Charts Company data, after debuting with nearly 106,000 sales the week before. Its former No. 1 single “Mirrors” slipped 2-4. “The 20/20 Experience” finished well ahead of Depeche Mode’s 28,000 sales, the veteran electronic band’s new release not having the benefit of a major hit single, after “Heaven” peaked at No. 60 last week.

David Bowie’s “The Next Day” (RCA/Sony) and Emeli Sandé’s “Our Version of Events” (Virgin EMI/Universal) each fell a place at Nos. 3 and 4, with Bruno Mars up a place to No. 5 with “Unorthodox Jukebox” (Atlantic/Warner Music). The Lumineers’ self-titled Decca/Universal set moved 11-8, as the Strokes’ fifth album “Comedown Machine” (Rough Trade) started at No. 10 on 12,000 sales. There were top 20 entries for Eric Clapton’s “Old Sock” (Polydor/Universal) at No. 13, English rock quartet Peace with “In Love” (Columbia/Sony) at No. 16 and Simple Minds’ “Celebrate - The Greatest Hits” (Virgin EMI/Universal) at No. 19.

The latest “Now” compilation comes as the series prepares for its 30th anniversary, with sales still remarkably robust. The last release, “Now 83,” may have started with a bigger opening sale of 295,000, but that was in the traditionally buoyant pre-Christmas market; the more relevant comparison is with last April’s “Now 81,” which opened on 255,000, some 6,000 below the new collection’s tally.

Ant & Dec performed “Let’s Get Ready To Rhumble” Mar. 23 on their primetime ITV series “Saturday Night Takeaway,” propelling it to the chart summit with 83,000 downloads, 19 years after it reached No. 9, the only top tenner among PJ & Duncan’s nine original hits between 1994 and 1996. New sales benefit the Childline charity.

Pink’s “Just Give Me A Reason” (RCA/Sony), featuring Nate Ruess, moved up 3-2 on sales of 78,000 as last week’s No. 1, “What About Us” (Polydor/Universal) by the Saturdays featuring Sean Paul, fell to No. 3. London pop singer-songwriter Charlie Brown debuted at No. 7 with “On My Way” (All Around The World/Universal) and Nelly jumped 15-9 with “Hey Porsche” (Republic/Universal). His Republic labelmate Psy’s 28-week run in the top 40 with “Gangnam Style” came to an end as the mega-hit fell 39-50.