Australian-born pop queen Kylie Minogue is the recipient of the 2007 Music Industry Trusts' Award and the first woman to win the title in the event's 16-year history. The honor is bestowed annually to an individual who has made a distinctive and lasting contribution to the British music industry. The award has raised over £2.7 million ($5.4 million) for Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy and the BRIT Trust.

Minogue, who is described by committee chairman David Munns as "by far the most glamorous" recipient in the event's history, will receive her award in a presentation at London's Grosvenor House on Oct. 29. That's three months before the 20th anniversary of the singer's first U.K. hit, "I Should Be So Lucky," the first of her seven No. 1 singles in the market.

The committee is recognizing Minogue's "universally acclaimed status as an icon of pop and style achieved over a 20 year career which has seen her reinvent, experiment and inspire." In a statement issued today, the committee said, "Kylie has established one of the longest and most successful careers as a performer in contemporary popular music and her tenacity and determination to succeed, on and off the stage, have been an inspiration to so many. Kylie has a unique place in this country's heart and an appeal that seems to grow ever wider. We salute Kylie for her unique gifts as one of the great entertainers of all time."

The MITS award, as it has become known, was won last year by promoter and entrepreneur Harvey Goldsmith. Previous honorees have included Peter Gabriel, Elton John and Bernie Taupin, John Barry, George Martin, former BPI director general John Deacon, Ahmet Ertegun and DJ Alan Freeman.

"It is an incredible honor to be the recipient of this year's Music Industry Trusts’ Award and I am truly thrilled to be recognized in this way," comments Minogue. "As well as being a fantastic evening, this award ceremony also raises much needed funds for the Brit Trust and Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy and it is a pleasure for me to be involved."

Minogue is a household name in Britain, where she first rose to fame in the 1980s as an actor in the Australian soap opera "Neighbours."

She recently hit the comeback trail after taking time out to recuperate from breast cancer. Prior to her diagnosis in 2005, the singer became the first solo female artist to play a seven-night string of dates at the 18,500-seat capacity Earls Court venue. Madonna previously had that record with six nights in 2001.