-- In a statement following the UK government's consultation period on anti-piracy measures, The UK Music Managers Forum has called for statutory licensing in the event parties cannot agree to voluntary licensing agreements. It carries the following passage: "If the creative industries and the ISPs cannot come to voluntary licensing agreements and provide services that mimic illegal P2P then the Government should intervene and impose licensing solutions that could include statutory licensing in the same way that radio is licensed." In other words, the group is calling for the creation of services that feel like free, unencumbered P2P. Of course, actual P2P does not grant artists (or their managers) any control - not over the timing of a release, not over derivative works, not over the price to the consumer. So it will be very interesting to see just what aspects of P2P they want replicated in legal services and how comfortable they will be with loss of control. (Music Ally)

-- Check out this panoramic view of U2's 360° Tour concert in Chicago. (USA Today)

- Read the prepared remarks of FCC chairman Julius Genachowski at the Future of Music Summit on Monday. An excerpt: "None of us can imagine what tomorrow's innovators will bring into being. But if we follow through in protecting the free and open Internet and in achieving universal broadband, we can be confident that the dreamers nobody has ever heard of who need an open platform to bring their vision to life -- the grad student in a lab today, the group of kids in a college dorm, the inventor in the proverbial garage -- will each have a realistic shot at seeing their dreams become reality." (FCC.gov, Word doc)

- Read the prepared remarks of Senator Al Franken at the Future of Music Summit on Monday. An excerpt: "Great innovations only take place on an even playing field, where the little guys can go head-to-head with the big guys. If we change the rules of the game to benefit the big guys, innovation will suffer. So the issue here isn't only what might be blocked from us, but also what might never be developed in the first place." (Minnesota Independent, PDF file)

- Social media is replacing search and portals for some content discovery, according to the Nielsen Company. About 18% of the U.S. online population uses social media as a "core navigation and information discovery tool." But take out Wikipedia, which is far more of a one-way street than the other sites Nielsen classifies as social media, and you're down to 9% of the online population who starts an online search with social media - 5% for blogs and 4% for Twitter, MySpace, Facebook and other social networks. Why do they use social media as a navigation tool? "The short answer: Socializers trust what their friends have to say and social media acts as an information filtration tool." But keep in mind this information speaks only where consumers discover content, not what content they are discovering. (Nielsen Wire

-- Even though it was launched last week, Blackberry's 7digital MP3 store is in the news today. The store's low prices are a topic of conversation. U.S. customers can get some albums for $7.77 and tracks for $0.77. A few newer hits are priced higher. Browse around the U.S. store and you wonder if it's really open for business and who is shopping. The Top 20 Albums chart contains the likes of Syd Barrett, Band of Horses and Puddle of Mudd. The Top 20 Singles chart has Johnny Greenwood, two tracks by Anointed and three from Praise Hymn Tracks. That's an interesting purchase history. (The Register and LA Times Technology blog)

-- Sonic Youth frontman Thurston Moore is starting his own book publishing company, Ecstatic Peace Library. Moore plans to release art books by Raymond Pettibon, Dave Markey and Kim Gordon (of Sonic Youth). (The Bookseller)

-- Data from mobile analytics company Flurry shows the fleeting nature of most mobile phone apps. Two-thirds of apps are used more than 30 days after being downloaded, one-third are used more than 60 days and one-quarter are used beyond 90 days. As for music apps, about 26% are used beyond 90 days - right on the average. Medical, news and social media apps have the highest retention rates. Lifestyle, books and entertainment have the lowest retention rates. Do these rates seem low? Well, there's sure to be a lot of sampling happening by consumers, which would pull down numbers such as these. It takes very little effort to install, use and either sit on or delete a mobile app. So when people talk about the number of iPhone apps that have been downloaded (it's not over two billion) keep in mind many of those apps got very little attention. (Silicon Alley Insider)