frikstailers

Frikstailers photographed in 2015.

Brenda Islas

Remezcla, a Latin American culture outlet, has signed on with Apple Music to curate the company's Latin content for the company's streaming service, Apple Music.

Remezcla is Apple’s first post-launch Latin curation partner, and the first curator recruited by Apple Music to create playlists for the service in Latin America.

"Our mission has always been to solve the problem of discovery," Remezcla CEO Andrew Herrera says of the brand, which began as a New York Latino events guide and now covers scenes in cities across the United States, as well as serving as the voice of what the Brooklyn-based Remezcla identifies as Latin America’s "new wave." Remezcla also produces content for major brands, festivals and other events who want to reach young Latinos.

"It’s really hard for people to discover things that they don’t know exists," Herrera says, explaining that Remezcla’s playlists will bring attention to music beyond the major labels. "We’re featuring artists who aren’t categorized by traditional Latin music genres, and who may be doing things that would not usually be considered ‘Latin music.’ A lot of people will be able to hear this music for the first time [through Remezcla’s playlists on Apple Music]."

Remezcla’s current offerings, available on Apple music since last week, include a sampler of tracks from Austin’s underground scene, a preview of music from bands playing Colombia’s Hermoso Ruido Festival, a playlist of reggaeton pioneers, and Remezcla managing editor Andrea Gompf’s female artist picks. Another playlist is supplied by the explosive "digital cumbia" duo Frikstailers, who records on Buenos-Aires based indie ZZK and is now based in Mexico City.

"The fact that Apple went with someone like Remezcla instead of a mainstream property shows what we can offer in a genre that hasn’t been as innovative as it should be," Herrera commented.

An Apple spokesman told Billboard that Apple Music plans to enter into similar kinds of promotional agreements with other Latin music curation partners, which would add to the service’s offering for both U.S. Latin and Latin American audiences.