Jerry Lee Lewis
Steve Roberts

On the latest Billboard 200 albums chart, Taylor Swift dominated the tally, as her new 1989 album crashed in at No. 1. It sold 1.287 million copies in the week ending Nov. 2, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

Roadmap to Taylor Swift's Big Week in 6 (Not-So-Easy) Steps

Of course, there was lots of chart action outside of Swift's monster debut. Let's take a closer look:

Jerry Lee Lewis, Rock & Roll Time - No. 140 — Goodness, gracious! Rock legend Jerry Lee Lewis is back on the Billboard 200 chart with his latest guest-filled album, Rock & Roll Time. The set, which was released on Shangri-La/Vanguard/Welk, bows at No. 140, selling 3,000 copies in its first week, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

The new album -- his first for Vanguard -- features collaborations with Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, Neil Young, Robbie Robertson, Shelby Lynne and others. (Richards and Wood play on "Little Queenie," below.) The set’s release came during the same week that his authorized biography, "Jerry Lee Lewis: His Own Story" (by Rick Bragg) was released.

 

Lewis, 79, was completely absent from the Billboard 200 chart from 1979 until 2006, when he returned with the star-studded album Last Man Standing: The Duets. It debuted and peaked at No. 26 -- his highest charting album ever -- and has sold 213,000 (his best-selling album since SoundScan started tracking sales in 1991). He followed up Last Man Standing with another collaborations set, Mean Old Man, which hit No. 30 in 2010.

The new album arrives 57 years to the month after one of Lewis' most familiar hits, "Great Balls of Fire," peaked at No. 2 on the Best Sellers in Stores chart. The song would later double as the title of the 1989 film about Lewis' life, starring Dennis Quaid.

— Soundtrack, Begin Again - No. 64 – The music-driven film's release on home video (Oct. 28) pushes a big 271 percent sales hike for its soundtrack (6,000 sold for the week).

The Who, The Who Hits 50! - No. 93 – The new greatest-hits album celebrates the band's 50th anniversary. The iconic group adopted the name The Who in February 1964 and released its first single, "I Can't Explain," that December.

Michael Buble, Christmas - No. 120 – The pop singer's holiday set charts for a fourth Christmas season, following its 2011 release. It re-enters at No. 120. In 2013, it sold 314,000 copies and was the fourth-biggest-selling holiday set of that year.

Soundtrack, Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas - No. 137 – This is likely the only Halloween-themed title that is also categorized as a Christmas album. With 3,000 sold in the week that included Halloween, this is its best sales week since Halloween 2007 (4,000).

Ryan Adams, Vampires - No. 156 – This four-song EP (3,000 sold) isn't just any EP: It's a four-song album squeezed onto a 7" vinyl single (with a total running time of just more than 12 minutes) and digital download. Eighty-one percent of its first-week sales were vinyl, with enough sales to enter at No. 4 on the Vinyl Albums chart.