Name: Mike Tunnicliffe
Title: Brands, Technology & Entertainment Entrepreneur/ Partner, Frukt-USA
Panel: Beyond the TV Commercial, How Are Artists Striking New Deals With Brands? Tuesday, June 15, 9:00am – 9:50am. For more information visit Billboardevents.com.

What's the last album you bought?
The Rolling Stones "Exile On Main Street" (re-release).

Do you Twitter? If so, how often? If not, why not?
Yes I do. I tend to Twitter and upload photos when I’m watching live music. Particularly if my kids are performing as part of Tomatoes House Of Rock in NYC.

What's been the best use of music in advertising you've recently seen?
Perhaps not as recent as some but I think that one of the cleverest ideas around was the writing of Chris Brown’s "Forever" as a single that was originally written for Wrigley’s Doublemint gum but then released as a single without any mention of the tie in to Wrigley. The song then appeared in the Wrigley's TV commercial once it had been seeded in popular culture and became a hit. For all Chris Brown’s recent bad press this was still a great idea and a great way to "double your pleasure double your fun."

At this moment in time, what most worries and encourages you about the music business?
What worries me is the total lack of entrepreneuriam and decision making skills from many executives in the traditional labels. It’s almost a complete waste of time taking any new or vaguely ‘speculative’ ideas to them. What encourages though me is that there are plenty of smart people around who have either left the ‘traditional’ mindset behind (and often their well paid corporate jobs) or, like me, haven’t come out of the music business but have seen the opportunities to create some new order out of the chaos.

What is the most significant moment in the history of music and advertising?
Coca Cola’s hilltop commercial from 1971. A totally iconic song - "I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing" that was originally written as a song for Coke, which was then recorded by the New Seekers and after starting out as a flop became one of the most iconic and memorable advertising songs ever written. The story of the song makes great reading.

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