British public broadcaster BBC has pledged to evaluate the planned contents of live performances before they go on air on "Top of the Pops," the U.K.'s flagship music show. The move is in response to

British public broadcaster BBC has pledged to evaluate the planned contents of live performances before they go on air on "Top of the Pops," the U.K.'s flagship music show. The move is in response to criticism leveled at the network by media watchdog Ofcom for "inappropriate dance routines" on the Nov. 7, 2003, edition of the show.

London-based Ofcom investigated eight complaints from viewers. They expressed concern at the "sexual and violent overtones" of the performance by band Phixx, which was making its top-10 debut with the single "Hold on Me," on U.K. indie label Concept.

In a response, the BBC says that it "considered that this routine -- with its gestures of hitting and hair-pulling, the use of chains around the men's torsos and necks, and overall bondage-club atmosphere -- was unsuitable for an audience which typically includes a high proportion of children and young teenagers. It was also concerned about the message that children might take from such as performance, i.e.. that forms of restraints were playthings."

According to a "Top of the Pops" spokesperson, a new production team now works on the show. It is now executive-produced by Andi Peters, who officially came on board in October. The producer who worked on the Nov. 7 edition has since left.

That edition was also pre-recorded on a Thursday to air the next day. Now that "Top of the Pops" is a totally live show, the spokesperson says the production team is more careful about the contents.

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