In the first federal U.S. case charging copyright infringement of motion pictures, a Minnesota man pled guilty Monday (Feb. 9) in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

In the first federal U.S. case charging copyright infringement of motion pictures, a Minnesota man pled guilty Monday (Feb. 9) in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Andrew Pnewski was sentenced to six months of home detention with electronic bracelet monitoring, four years of probation and restitution in the amount of $7,170 to be paid to the Motion Picture Assn. of America.

Pnewski also signed a consent decree to forfeit computer equipment seized by the FBI that he used to illegally record motion pictures.

Pnewski had previously told the FBI that he downloaded movies via peer-to-peer service eDonkey, recorded copies onto CD-Rs and then sold them on eBay. The pirated films included "The Hulk," "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers" and "The Matrix Reloaded." He was caught last year after an FBI agent purchased 16 movies from him between March and August.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboardbiz

Print