The Canadian Recording Industry Assn. (CRIA) filed an appeal today (April 13) of the Federal Court of Canada's recent ruling that Internet Service Providers did not have to reveal the identitities of

The Canadian Recording Industry Assn. (CRIA) filed an appeal today (April 13) of the Federal Court of Canada's recent ruling that Internet Service Providers did not have to reveal the identitities of alleged uploaders of music files. The court also found that downloading does not constitute copyright infringement under current Canadian law.

The appeal was filed in Toronto.

The Federal Court ruled March 31 against a motion by the CRIA that would have allowed the association to begin suing individuals who make unauthorized music available online. The Federal Court ruled that the ISPs in question -- Bell/Sympatico, Rogers Communications Inc., Shaw Communications Inc. and Telus Corp. -- could not be forced to reveal the names and addresses of 29 people who allegedly had shared a "high volume" of songs via the Internet
in November and December 2003.

In his 28-page ruling, Justice Konrad von Finckenstein said that CRIA did not prove there was copyright infringement by the alleged uploaders. He further ruled that downloading a song or making files available in shared files does not constitute copyright infringement.