Digital music company eMusic is launching a post-concert MP3 service entitled eMusicLive, which will enable fans to download MP3s via club kiosks immediately after a concert.

Digital music company eMusic is launching a post-concert MP3 service entitled eMusicLive, which will enable fans to download MP3s via club kiosks immediately after a concert.

To purchase an eMusicLive MP3 - priced at $10 -- concert-goers will either bring their own USB pen drive to shows, or purchase the file-transferring device at the club for $20. Revenues from the service are split between the artist, venue and eMusic.

Indie band Elysian Fields will be the first act to try out the technology with a show at New York's SIR Studios tonight (April 27). Over the course of next year, other clubs slated to house the kiosks include such independently-owned venues as The 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C., Chicago's Metro, Minneapolis' First Avenue and the Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill, N.C.

There are plans for eMusic to eventually sell recorded CDs at shows. The eMusic Web site will also make available all live MP3s one day after the concert. Currently, there are 400,000 tracks in eMusic's song pool, and the site has a subscription service with 65,000 members.

A number of major players already exist in the post-concert digital music market. Earlier this year, Clear Channel Entertainment's (CCE) Instant Live began installing a number of recording systems inside CCE-owned clubs. Additionally, technology firm Immediatek recently acquired DiscLive, which has been selling post-concert CDs on the Pixies reunion tour.

Executives at eMusic are counting on the company's reliance on indie acts to court fans. "A lot of times a [major label] product manager will say they are coming out with a studio record, so they don't want to sell a live album," eMusic CEO Danny Stein tells Billboard.biz. "Our business is a little different [from rivals] -- this is live music out of some of the best small clubs in the country."