Ray Dolby, founder and chairman of Dolby Laboratories, will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame Saturday (May 1) in recognition of his invention of the Dolby noise reduction system. D

Ray Dolby, founder and chairman of Dolby Laboratories, will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame Saturday (May 1) in recognition of his invention of the Dolby noise reduction system. Dolby noise reduction electronically reduces the tape hiss and other noise inherent in analog audio tape recording and playback.

Dolby Laboratories has licensed more than 1.5 billion consumer products, including more than 500 million products incorporating Dolby Digital and almost 200 million home-theater systems incorporating Dolby technology. The company has been granted 780 patents in 28 countries and 771 trademark registrations in 96 countries. Dolby films are mixed in 50 countries.

Dolby technologies have been applied in audio recording and post-production, cinema, home theater, television broadcasting, PCs, videogames, automobiles and personal computers.

Ray Dolby received a BS in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Cambridge University in 1961. He founded Dolby Laboratories in 1965 to further develop his ideas about noise reduction. By 1967, record labels such as Decca in the U.K. and RCA, MCA and CBS in the U.S. were using Dolby noise reduction.

Dolby will be inducted along with 19 other inventors including Frederick Banting, Charles Best and James Collip, the inventors of insulin; Harry Coover, the inventor of Superglue; and Ivan Getting and Bradford Parkinson, co-inventors of the Global Positioning System.

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