A London council is taking legal measures against two major record companies for repeated illegal posting of fliers on its streets.

A London council is taking legal measures against two major record companies for repeated illegal posting of fliers on its streets.

The Metropolitan police served notice last Thursday (May 27) that Camden council in North London is seeking Anti-Social Behavior Orders (ASBO) against marketing executives from BMG U.K. and Ireland and Sony Music Entertainment U.K.

A spokesperson for Camden confirms Sony Music U.K. managing director Catherine Davies, and her colleague Jo Headland, marketing director for its international division, have been notified; BMG U.K. temporary work placement Lucy Hansford was also contacted.

The council says its acted in response to more than a thousand complaints from residents and businesses. If the council succeeds with its order, the executives will face the courts and potential jail sentences of up to five years. Neither Sony nor BMG would comment.

Lasting up to two years, the ASBOs are civil procedures aimed largely at teenagers, who risk imprisonment if they breach orders to cease unruly behavior. The order can stop offenders entering certain areas.

A hearing has been set for June 14 at Highbury Corner Magistrates Court.

Camden says the two majors repeatedly ignored prosecutions and requests to stop placing posters illegally within the borough. Through the practice, Camden estimates that BMG and Sony were each year saving £5.6 million ($10.28 million) and £3 million ($5.5 million), respectively, in legitimate advertising costs in that region alone.

"Flyposting has a detrimental impact on the value of property and contributes to people's fear of crime and, as a result, to actual criminal behavior, which is why we are seeking to outlaw it," comments Dame Jane Roberts, Leader of Camden council.

Encams, the British environmental charity behind the Keep Britain Tidy campaign, is endorsing Camden council's actions and has vowed to step up it battle against illegally placed adverts. "We are 100% behind Camden but if their tough stance still doesn't stem the tide, we'll look at other ways of using the law to stop them flyposting," comments Encams CEO Alan Woods.

Camden says it spends £250,000 ($458,000) annually tackling the problem.

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