Lots of rock stars play video games. But Sonny Sandoval, lead singer of multi-Platinum recording artist P.O.D., has become an investor in Gamecaster Inc. He also has been named music director of the g

Lots of rock stars play video games. But Sonny Sandoval, lead singer of multi-Platinum recording artist P.O.D., has become an investor in Gamecaster Inc. He also has been named music director of the gaming events company, and will perform as on-camera talent.

The company has plans to turn video-game competitions into a spectator sport franchise with a high profile on television, online and in the physical world. The first official event is scheduled for Aug. 24 in San Diego.

David MacIntosh, president/CEO of Gamecaster, says Sandoval will be responsible for developing the company's music program, which includes the use of popular bands to perform at Gamecaster's upcoming televised video game competitions.

As the newest member of the Gamecaster team, Sandoval joins MacIntosh; Rick Gentile, previously senior VP of CBS Sports; and Victor Lucas, president of Greedy Productions Ltd.

Without disclosing his financial arrangement with the self-funded company, Sandoval said he believes being part of Gamecaster is a good business move.

Besides shaping the live-music aspect of the traveling event, Sandoval has signed up as on-air talent in the role of Pit Reporter. He will provide color commentary and interviews with the competitors, helping to build the excitement and develop the human drama, MacIntosh says.

The Gamecaster spectacle will center on a dramatic slowly rotating circular platform, upon which gamers will compete in a winner-takes-all tournament while giant screens beam the action to the venue audience. Live music, a product licensing program designed by Bill Attinger of Scribbles Properties, and other lifestyle-related activities will all be part of the mix. Television audiences and webcast audiences each will get an experience tailored to their medium.

"We're out to prove that people will tune in or come live to watch," MacIntosh says. "Television didn't think poker would work, either."

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