P2P United is awaiting reaction this week from the heads of the five major record labels after writing to them individually last Thursday.

WASHINGTON--P2P United is awaiting reaction this week from the heads of the five major record labels after writing to them individually last Thursday.

P2P United is urging the Big Five to make Audible Magic software, which has been touted as a solution to unlawful music downloading, available for independent testing and analysis.

In its missives, P2P United noted that the RIAA had waved off a similar request made to RIAA chairman Mitch Bainwol on Feb. 24. At the time, the RIAA said it could not fulfill the request, citing the proprietary nature of Audible Magic's program.

Accordingly, P2P United wrote to Audible Magic CEO Vance Ikezoye on March 9, requesting access to the software in order to facilitate independent tests. Ikezoy had not replied to that inquiry as of last Friday.

In its letter to Ikezoye last Tuesday, P2P United asked him to "cease misleading the public and policy-makers by characterizing your 'fingerprinting' software as a 'filter."

The activist group also urged Ikezoye to clarify whether he believes that Audible Magic should be adopted as a technological mandate for all peer-to-peer communications and,if so, whether such a mandate should apply to other popular forms of electronic communication, such as conventional e-mail and instant messaging.

P2P United awaits Ikezoye's reaction this week. Meanwhile, Big Five execs had no public comment as of last Friday.

The letters were sent to Roger Ames of Warner Music Group; Rolf Schmidt-Holta of BMG; Andrew Lack of Sony; Doug Morris of Universal; Alain Levy of EMI; and Adam M. Eisgrau of Flanagan Consulting LLC.

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