Cui Jian, widely acknowledged as China's biggest rock act, sued undisclosed audio-visual companies in Beijing on Feb. 26, seeking 330,000 Chinese yuan ($40,000) in damages from piracy and copyright vi

BEIJING--Cui Jian, widely acknowledged as China's biggest rock act, sued undisclosed audio-visual companies in Beijing on Feb. 26, seeking 330,000 Chinese yuan ($40,000) in damages from piracy and copyright violations.

The suit included undisclosed manufacturers/distributors in Beijing and Tianjin, and the Henan province. Court documents in China are not open to public scrutiny, and disclosure of plaintiffs can serve as grounds for defamation litigation. Cui was not available for comment.

Cui's fifth studio album, "The Village Attacks the City," has been completed, but a distribution deal has not yet been signed.

Cui took the stage in a Beijing arena in January for the first time in over a decade, having been banned from staging concerts in the capital and in Shanghai since 1993. He opened for Taiwan Rock Records act Wu Bai. Cui's five-song set included his controversial hit "Nothing to My Name," a youth anthem that contributed to his disfavor among China's cultural authorities.

He is now slated to open for four dates by Sanctuary Records' Deep Purple when the veteran metal outfit arrives in March and April for dates in China.

Cui was scheduled to open for the ill-fated Rolling Stones concerts in spring 2003, until the outbreak of SARS led to their cancellation.

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