Paul Higgins and Trevor Carter, owners of Melbourne-based recording studio Studio 52 and label Empire Records, have filed a statement of claim in the country's Supreme Court against the parents of hit

MELBOURNE -- Paul Higgins and Trevor Carter, owners of Melbourne-based recording studio Studio 52 and label Empire Records, have filed a statement of claim in the country's Supreme Court against the parents of hit singer/songwriter Delta Goodrem.

Higgins and Carter are demanding a 10% share of profits from Goodrem's hit album "Innocent Eyes" (Sony) and from her next album as well.

In the 30-page claim, filed July 23, the pair say Goodrem's parents, Denis and Lea Goodrem, breached an agreement they signed in 1999. The singer was 14 years old at the time.

Under the deal, Higgins and Carter were to "produce, develop and manufacture a world-class commercially aimed album." Higgins and Carter also claim that they had an option to produce a second album. If the Goodrems chose not to utilize them for the second album, they say, the deal gave them a 10% cut of that set's profits, as well as 10% of the following album.

Higgins and Carter say they produced an album for Goodrem that was never released.

Goodrem then signed with Sony Music Entertainment Australia in 2001 and recorded a new album, "Innocent Eyes," which went on to become one of Australia's all-time best sellers, shifting more than 1 million units and spawning five No. 1 singles.

Lea Goodrem, who co-manages her daughter, could not be reached for comment. Higgins declined to comment.

Goodrem is currently preparing for the U.S. release of "Innocent Eyes" on Sony's Epic label. Her plan to enter the U.S. market last year was delayed when she contracted Hodgkin's disease. She is also working on a new album, according to reports.