The judge in the Kazaa civil case in Australia is expected to decide this week whether to allow Sharman to appeal the decision allowing MIPI to conduct raids in February.

SYDNEY--The judge in the Kazaa civil case in Australia is expected to decide this week whether to allow Sharman to appeal the decision allowing MIPI to conduct raids in February.

Sharman, the parent company of Kazaa, argues that the Anton Pillar search order which authorized the raids should not have been granted.

Sharman CEO Nikki Hemming calls the seizure of data during the raids "heavy-handed, unnecessary and indicative of the recording industry's increasing desperation to crush peer-to-peer technology. We have complied full in U.S. proceedings and will continue to do so in this case under appropriate legal procedures."

Among the 12 premises raided were Sharman's offices in Sydney and the homes of its two senior executives.