The House Judiciary Subcommittee on July 21 approved the Family Movie Act in an 18-9 vote. Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) introduced the bill, H.R. 4586, on June 16. It states that movie filtering softwar

LOS ANGELES -- The House Judiciary Subcommittee on July 21 approved the Family Movie Act in an 18-9 vote.

Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) introduced the bill, H.R. 4586, on June 16. It states that movie filtering software does not violate copyright law.

The full House must still pass the bill, which has not been introduced in the Senate.

The Family Movie Act was proposed as the House was investigating a lawsuit between ClearPlay and the Directors Guild of America (DGA).

Utah-based ClearPlay manufactures software that allows film viewers to bypass certain scenes deemed as potentially inappropriate for children. The company sells filters for individual films that gives consumers the ability to skip graphic violence, sex, nudity and profanity.

The DGA filed a copyright-infringement suit against ClearPlay in 2002, alleging that the company's technology misrepresents directors' finished films and violates studio copyrights.

ClearPlay is also the target of a lawsuit filed May 13 by Nissim Corp. Nissim, the creator of a movie filtering product called CustomPlay, claims that the new ClearPlay-enabled DVD players, which debuted in April from RCA, infringe its patents.