Dutch audio producers' organization Gong has renewed its claim that it should receive fees from neighboring rights from SENA, the local collecting society. Neighboring rights are paid for use of music

AMSTERDAM -- Dutch audio producers' organization Gong has renewed its claim that it should receive fees from neighboring rights from SENA, the local collecting society.

Neighboring rights are paid for use of music in public spaces by broadcasters, bars, restaurants and shopping malls.

SENA collects the fees and distributes them to labels and performers. Unlike in Belgium, the United Kingdom, Germany and other countries, Dutch producers are not included in the group that benefits from these payments.

Gong spokesperson Chris Pilgram says that since 1993, when neighboring rights came into effect under Dutch copyright law, producers have been lobbying for a share.

Gong is requesting that SENA, which claims that it is abiding by the law, discuss the matter again at its annual meeting June 28.

Says Pilgram, "Behind every great artist stands a great producer. A triangle player gets money from SENA, but the producer that made the recording possible gets nothing."