George Maloof, owner of the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, is diving into the music business. Maloof is opening a state-of-the-art recording studio--the first of its kind to be put in a hotel and c

George Maloof, owner of the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, is diving into the music business.

Maloof is opening a state-of-the-art recording studio--the first of its kind to be put in a hotel and casino. He and his family have also inked a deal with Interscope Records to start their own label, Maloof Music.

The new 8,000-square-foot, multi-room recording studio is the brainchild of Maloof and TV producer/manager Larry Rudolph and is part of a general expansion of the resort.

"I just thought it would be interesting to have artists that want to come to Las Vegas, hang out and screw around in the recording studio and maybe record an album," Maloof says. "This will be the ultimate recording experience."

Maloof says the facility will be open 24 hours a day, with a concierge on hand to "help out with whatever service the band or artist needs." Special artists suites will have connections back into the recording studio that will enable artists to mix tracks from the privacy of their rooms.

For Maloof, the recording studio and record label are a natural expansion for the Palms Casino. Since the resort's inception 3 1/2 years ago, the Palms has become a music hot spot. Its clubs--Rain, Ghost Bar and Skin--have hosted performances by such acts as No Doubt, Pink, Korn and a surprise show by Britney Spears. Artists are drawn to the Palms because of its youth-oriented casino vibe, which Maloof hopes will make the recording studio even more enticing.

"We wanted the hotel to be on the cutting edge of everything, of what's happening with youth today when it comes to entertainment, dancing and restaurants," Maloof says.

Unlike many Vegas hotels that boast 3,000-plus rooms, the Palms, which is valued at $265 million, is only a 430-room property. With 20,000 square feet of meeting space, it has a more open feel than other casinos.

On the record label side, Maloof has been working closely with Interscope A&M Geffen chief Jimmy Iovine, head of sales and marketing Steve Berman as well as with Eminem's label, Shady Records. Maloof says they are putting together a marketing and business plan for two acts: one hip-hop and one rock.

With its dance clubs and overall casino sound system, the Palms offers a perfect marketing and promotion vehicle for a record label because airplay in the casino is guaranteed.

"I just have a huge passion for music," Maloof says. "I love concerts. I love the pop culture and how music relates to everything we do. It has such a huge influence on our culture; I just get a kick out of it."

Tamara Conniff is the music editor of Billboard sister publication The Hollywood Reporter.