The Federal Communications Commission is determined to continue cracking down on indecent programming, criticism from cable operators notwithstanding.

NEW ORLEANS (Hollywood Reporter)--The Federal Communications Commission is determined to continue cracking down on indecent programming, criticism from cable operators notwithstanding.

"For 70 years, the country has had limits on broadcast television. To me, censorship is prior restraint, and I don't think anybody has been involved in that limitation on content," said FCC chairman Michael Powell. Powell spoke last week at the National Cable & Telecommunications Assn.'s trade show in New Orleans.

But Oxygen Media CEO Geraldine Laybourne was one of several cable executives who took a decidedly different take on the FCC's enforcement efforts. "I don't think we should use the word indecency; we should call it what it is: censorship," she said. Laybourne commented after a Q&A session between Powell and NCTA chief Robert Sachs.

The remarks came as News Corp. executives expressed concern about the possible fallout from a memorial service for Pat Tillman, during which Tillman's brother reportedly used a version of the word "fuck" twice. The funeral service for Tillman, the former Arizona Cardinals football star who was killed while serving as an Army Ranger in Afghanistan, was carried by several News Corp. cable channels.

"Who would have thought you needed a seven-second delay at a memorial service?" one News Corp. executive lamented. "We're worried about it."

Powell declined to comment whether the FCC would investigate the broadcast.