As Phish's career-ending Coventry festival, which took place over the weekend in Vermont, is slowly dismantled, producers are mulling the impact of the torrential rain that preceded the event.

As Phish's career-ending Coventry festival, which took place over the weekend in Vermont, is slowly dismantled, producers are mulling the impact of the torrential rain that preceded the event.

After state police closed highways leading to the festival on Friday (Aug. 13), some fans walked miles to the muddy festival site, while others turned back.

"We're still sorting it out, but we estimate about 65,000 people were here on the grounds," says Dave Werlin, president of Great Northeast Productions, promoter of record for Coventry and all previous Phish festivals. "We're trying to understand how many people we'll have to offer refunds to."

He adds, "When people normally come in [to a Phish festival], they present their ticket, it's torn and they get a wristband, but this was far from normal. People came walking in from every direction. Most walked in and found their way to the box office and exchanged their ticket for a wristband and then found their way back to the stage."

Clearly, though, many Phish-heads entered the site without their tickets ever being torn. And then there are those that never made it in at all.

Instructions on how fans who were turned away can receive refunds are posted on Phish's official Web site. Werlin doesn't expect many fans who actually attended the concert to try and get a refund.

"We believe in the basic decency of Phish fans and think that will be a non-issue," says Werlin. "But we're still trying to get our hands around how many refunds there will be. Several thousand, anyway."

Werlin stresses that it was not the band, management or producers who made the decision to turn fans away, but rather Vermont state police. "To us, this was a frustrating decision because it was not our call," says Werlin. "It was not our desire to do things this way, but it became a public safety issue."

As it stands, Coventry will end up grossing about $10 million. Phish's IT festival last year in Limestone, Maine, grossed about $8.25 million.

Werlin has no regrets about the band's final performance. "We were blessed with clear skies on Saturday and decent weather on Sunday," he says. "The band played incredibly well, production was great, the sound was great, and there was a real emotional interaction with the fans."