Spanish singer/songwriter Alejandro Sanz was once again the big winner at the Latin Grammy Awards. His album, "No Es lo Mismo" (Warner), and the song of the same name took home five awards at the fift

Spanish singer/songwriter Alejandro Sanz was once again the big winner at the Latin Grammy Awards. His album, "No Es lo Mismo" (Warner), and the song of the same name took home five awards at the fifth annual award show, held tonight (Sept. 1) at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

Sanz snared trophies for record and song of the year for "No Es lo Mismo," and album and best male pop album of the year. These awards make Sanz the most-honored Latin Grammy act, with a total of 11 awards.

"No Es lo Mismo" also won for best engineered album, with the award going to Mick Guzauski, Rafa Sardina and Pepo Sherman.

Sanz wasn't present at the ceremony, but producer Lulo Perez thanked him onstage for "having trusted me at only 28 years of age. It's something incredible and something that every artist, no matter how prepared you are, feels deeply."

Following Sanz in number of awards were Brazilian newcomer Maria Rita and Café Tacuba's Emmanuel Del Real. Maria Rita was named best new artist, while her self-titled Warner debut took home best MPB album (popular Brazilian music).

"I had no expectations coming in today," said Maria Rita, who was up against urban/regional duo Akwid and Obie Bermudez in the best new artist category. "This is great for Brazilian music."

Del Real won for best rock song ("Eres") from Café Tacuba's "Cuatro Caminos" (Universal Music Mexico), which won best alternative music album.

The Latin Grammys aired live on CBS and featured a slew of bilingual and bicultural performances, including an opening number with David Bisbal and Jessica Simpson and later, Café Tacuba with Incubus. George Lopez hosted the awards for the second year in a row. Lopez spoke mostly in English, with smatterings of Spanish, as did most winners.

The Latin Grammys were presented in 43 categories for recordings released between April 1, 2003 through March 31, 2004. Winners were voted on by the approximately 3,000 members of the Latin Recording Academy.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboardbiz

Print