Longtime music executive Artie Mogull died Thursday (Nov. 25) of heart failure at his Beverly Hills, Calif., home. He was 77.

Longtime music executive Artie Mogull died Thursday (Nov. 25) of heart failure at his Beverly Hills, Calif., home. He was 77.

Mogull, best known for signing Bob Dylan to his first publishing contract with Warner Bros. Publishing, was also instrumental in the early careers of Kenny Rogers, Olivia Newton-John and Peter, Paul & Mary.

Mogull began his 50-year career in 1949 as a band boy for Tommy Dorsey's orchestra and went on to serve as VP of A&R at Warner Bros., MCA and Capitol Records.

He was named president of United Artists Records in 1976. Two years later, the label released Rogers' "The Gambler," which reached No. 12 on The Billboard 200. The same year, Mogull purchased the label from Trans America.

Before his death, Mogull co-founded Burbank, Calif.-based indie label Insane Records International, whose acts include the Hopeless, techno-pop newcomer Julie Collins and L.A.-based rock quartet A Race Called Man.

Mogull is survived by a brother, three daughters and four grandsons.