Two music-driven movies are among the 25 selected this year for the National Film Registry. The Registry annually recognizes works its committee deems to be culturally, historically or aesthetically s

Two music-driven movies are among the 25 selected this year for the National Film Registry. The Registry annually recognizes works its committee deems to be culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.

"Jailhouse Rock," released in 1957, was Elvis Presley's second film and the first vehicle to highlight his gyrating, hip-swiveling style. In the film, he sings tunes now considered staples of his canon: "Jailhouse Rock," "Treat Me Nice," "Baby I Don't Care" and "Don't Leave Me Now." Soon after the movie's release, the title tune vaulted to No. 1 on the Billboard Top 100 chart and stayed there for seven weeks. "Treat Me Nice" hit No. 28.

"Going My Way," released in 1944, starred Bing Crosby as easy-going Father Chuck O'Malley bringing New York street kids under his wing. In the film, Crosby sang tunes that were destined to become pop evergreens: "Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral," "Swinging On a Star," "Going My Way" and "Silent Night." The latter had already been a hit for Der Bingle in 1942; after the release of the movie, Crosby's version of the now-famous Irish lullaby went on to sell 1 million copies.

Other film selections picked this year range from the 1918 silent "The Blue Bird" to 1993's "Schindler's List." The selections bring the National Film Registry to 400 titles, all of which are receiving state-of-the-art preservation and archiving efforts.