All across Asia, people are digging deep to give to survivors of the worst tsunami on record and tomorrow more than 100 entertainers from China, Hong Kong and Taiwan will pitch in to raise funds in a

All across Asia, people are digging deep to give to survivors of the worst tsunami on record and tomorrow more than 100 entertainers from China, Hong Kong and Taiwan will pitch in to raise funds in a variety show.

The performance will feature top Hong Kong stars like action hero Jackie Chan and singer Andy Lau, who will sing a Chinese version of the song "We Are The World", which Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie wrote in 1985 to raise money for famine-struck Africa.

The Chinese version of the song has been renamed "Love".

Tickets are free, but the show will be beamed live into mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and Malaysia.

"We will have telephone hotlines and donation boxes at the show. We will also sell souvenirs at the show where we hope to get donations," said Angela Wong of the Hong Kong Performing Artistes' Guild, which is helping organise the festival.

"We have not set any targets. The song is for the relief effort and it will not be released commercially."

On Wednesday in Hong Kong, a commercial advertising the "Crossing Borders Fund Raising Show" flashed repeatedly on television, with the city's popstars calling for support.

The show is the latest in a string of private sector initiatives in Hong Kong to raise funds for survivors of the Dec. 26 tsunami which killed 150,000 people in Indonesia, India, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and other countries as far away as Africa.

More than five million people are homeless or displaced, mostly in unsanitary conditions and experts have warned that they face a range of epidemics if help is not made available.

The catastrophe has left no one untouched and ordinary people from across the region have dug deep.

Over the weekend in Hong Kong, hawkers donated vegetables and shoppers paid as much as HK$1,500 ($192) for a small bag of lettuce, with the proceeds going to help the relief effort.

"We are really all part of this planet and where we can help, we should," said Elizabeth Lee, a computer consultant in Hong Kong, who donated HK$500 ($64) to the Red Cross, which has raised over HK$200 million ($25.6 million) in the Chinese city so far.

The tragedy has also brought some of the most reclusive nations closer to the rest of the world.

North Korea, one of the world's poorest countries that depends on foreign aid to help feed about a quarter of its people, said on Wednesday it was donating $150,000 in emergency relief to the countries devastated by the tsunami.

The communist state is no stranger to natural disaster and a famine in the late 1990s is estimated to have killed more than one million people and prompted up to 300,000 people to seek refuge in neighbouring China.

Its more prosperous capitalist neighbour South Korea has pledged $50 million for tsunami relief over three years.

Some popstars in the region are doing more than just singing.

South Korean soap star Bae Yong-joon, a darling of Asia's middle-aged housewives, has donated 300 million won ($289,000) to the World Vision group to help the tsunami relief effort, media reported.

A few Hong Kong stars, including singers Cecilia Cheung and Jaycee Chan - son of action movie star Jackie Chan - are heading to disaster areas as volunteers.