The Canadian Private Copying Collective announced yesterday (Jan. 13) that it will seek to appeal a Canadian <A HREF="http://www.billboard.com/bb/biz/archivesearch/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1

The Canadian Private Copying Collective announced yesterday (Jan. 13) that it will seek to appeal a Canadian federal court ruling last month that overturned levies of up to $25 Canadian ($20.61) on digital music players such as iPods. The group says the court erred in deciding that the federally appointed Canadian Copyright Board did not have jurisdiction to impose such a levy.

"Creators of recorded music deserve remuneration for the use of their work," says CPCC chair Claudette Fortier. "It is our responsibility to uphold that principle even when new developments in technology change the ways in which Canadians make private copies of music."

Canada's Copyright Act gives the federal board the authority to apply levies on blank media such as CDs and audiocassettes. But the act has not been updated to address new technology such as MP3 players, which use an embedded memory rather than discs or cassettes, to store digital copies of songs.

Established in 1999, the CPCC is a non-profit agency that represents authors, composers, music publishers, artists and record companies in collecting and distributing private copying royalties.