Industry organizations representing the whole spectrum of the music sector are urging U.S. authorities to "ensure that creators and performers are given a fair deal."

Industry organizations representing the whole spectrum of the music sector are urging U.S. authorities to "ensure that creators and performers are given a fair deal."

In a joint statement, these organizations claim their primary goal is "to raise awareness of the issues facing their creators and performers."

The key issues raised by the signatories include the low level of royalties collected in the United States, and "stringent visa requirements" for British acts who wish to tour stateside.

The statement was issued jointly by creators' and music publishers' organization British Music Rights, indie labels' body AIM, managers' group MMF, artists' union MU and collecting society PPL.

The statement continues, "Even when [British acts] do break into America, they find that the U.S. operates beneath acceptable international copyright standards, meaning that bands are not properly rewarded when their music is played in bars and restaurants or on the radio."

PPL indicates that the Unites States has not granted rights to performers and producers to receive payment for the broadcast and public performance of their works stateside.

According to British Music Rights, the European Commission has estimated that European music writers and publishers are losing more than $25 million each year as a result of the United States' ongoing failure to comply with international copyright regulations.

"We are disappointed to see that the U.S., normally such a staunch defender of IP, is failing to meet international standards on music royalties," commented BMR director general Emma Pike.

To raise the profile of British music in the United States, these bodies, alongside label's organizations BPI, have teamed to present a united front at the South by SouthWest 2005 trade show in Austin, Texas in March. "Whilst the need to showcase acts in America is important there are still several key areas where our U.S. neighbors are not playing ball and we would like to see some movement to address these issues, some of which risk setting precedents for other countries," says the statement.