The Grammy Foundation's seventh annual Entertainment Law Initiative (ELI) luncheon and scholarship presentation was held on Feb. 11 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Gathering at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Ho

The Grammy Foundation's seventh annual Entertainment Law Initiative (ELI) luncheon and scholarship presentation was held on Feb. 11 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Gathering at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel were more than 460 industry lawyers, executives and other guests, including former attorney general Janet Reno.

The national legal writing competition and scholarship program, co-sponsored by the American Bar Assn., invites law students to research, analyze and submit essays regarding important issues facing the industry.

Law student Adam Giuliano from New York University School of Law won the competition, receiving a $5,000 scholarship. He presented his paper, entitled "Steal this Concert? The Federal Anti-Bootlegging Statute Gets Struck Down, But Not Out," and spoke about his selected topic to the gathering. The article will be published in the ABA Forum on Entertainment and Sports Industries Journal and the Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal.

Runner-up winners, who also attended the presentation and briefly discussed their topics, were:

Adam Halston Dunst from New York University School of Law for his paper, "'It's Mine! No, It's Mine! No, It's Mine!' Works-Made-For-Hire, Section 203 of the Copyright Act, and Sound Recordings";

Kristina Groennings from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law for her work, "An Analysis of the Recording Industry's Litigation Strategy Against Direct Infringers";

Carlos Ruiz de la Torre from the University of New Mexico School of Law for his essay, "Digital Music Sampling & Copyright Law: Can the Interests of Copyright Owners and Sampling Artists be Reconciled?"; and

Kara M. Wolke from the Ohio State Moritz College of Law for her paper, "Some Catching Up To Do: How the U.S., in Refusing to Fully Sign on to the WPPT's Public Performance Right in Sound Recordings, Fell Behind the Protections of Artists' Rights Recognized Elsewhere in this Increasingly Global Music Community."

These students each received $1,500 scholarships, and their articles will appear in the Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal.

Warner Music Group chairman/CEO Edgar Bronfman, Jr. presented the keynote address.

Recording Academy president Neil Portnow and ELI project coordinator Cole Sternberg welcomed the guests. Don Passman, ELI advisory committee chair, presented the winners. Artists Kyle Riabko and Renee Olstead with David Foster performed.

ELI was formed by the Grammy Foundation and a group of entertainment attorneys in 1998 to promote discussion and debate about legal issues facing the music industry. They hope to promote future careers in entertainment law by offering law students networking and educational opportunities.