The Federal Communications Commission on Feb. 28 denied a number of indecency complaints.

NEW YORK -- The Federal Communications Commission on Feb. 28 denied a number of indecency complaints.

In one matter, the FCC considered complaints regarding the broadcast of the film "Saving Private Ryan" by various television stations affiliated with the ABC Television Network. Although the film contains "numerous expletives and other potentially offensive language generally as part of the soldiers' dialogue," the FCC wrote, it was not "indecent or profane in light of the overall context in which this material is presented."

The commission noted that while the complaint targeted the violence depicted in the film, the FCC's indecency and profanity prohibitions do not apply to violent programming.

In another matter, the FCC denied a complaint by the Parents Television Council alleging that Fox Television Stations Inc. aired indecent material in an episode of "Arrested Development."

The complaint referred to multiple scripted bleeps and some sexual innuendo dealing with homosexuality. In particular, the episode contained a reference to "making corn-holes" and then "corn-holing" (which the PTC claimed was "slang for anal sex"), within the context of discussions of a "corn baller," an implement for making popcorn balls.

The FCC reviewed a videotape of the episode provided by the PTC and found that the material was not sufficiently explicit or graphic to be deemed indecent.

Another complaint filed by the PTC was also denied on Feb. 28. It claimed that NBC Television Network stations aired indecent material during an episode of "Will and Grace." The episode concerned a visit to a doctor's office, the complaint stated, that contained "a lot of references to drug use and some graphic sexual content."

The commission reviewed the episode and noted that it did not depict nudity, sexual or excretory activities and that the dialogue was not sufficiently explicit or graphic to be indecent.