The company that produces "Girls Gone Wild" -- racy tapes of young women baring their breasts -- was ordered to pay a woman $60,000 after a jury determined that filmmakers illegally used her image in


VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) -- The company that produces "Girls Gone Wild" -- racy tapes of young women baring their breasts -- was ordered to pay a woman $60,000 after a jury determined that filmmakers illegally used her image in a video.

The damages which jurors awarded to 26-year-old Debbie Aficial represent $1 for each copy of "Girls Gone Wild: The Seized Video" that Mantra Films sold last fall, according to her attorney Kevin Martingayle.

"In isolation, $60,000 doesn't do anything," Martingayle said. "But it may establish a precedent for others to follow."

Martingayle is also representing Aimee Davalle in a separate case against the company. Her trial is scheduled for Nov. 29.

Both lawsuits stem from a February 2003 incident when, according to testimony, the two women attended a promotional event at a Norfolk, Va., bar where they were approached by Mantra Films employees.

Aficial agreed to go to a nearby location and film a video, which encouraged Davalle to participate. Martingayle said neither had shown proof of age and therefore thought the footage would end up on the cutting room floor.

But later, Aficial saw a DVD with a topless Davalle on the cover.

The law at the heart of the case requires written consent to use someone's image in a commercial enterprise.

Founded in 1997, Mantra has released 83 different titles and sold 4.5 million videos and DVDs in 2002, according to Hoover's, a business data firm in Austin, Texas.

Shepherd Wainger, an attorney for Santa Monica, Calif.-based Mantra Films, said he could not comment on the case.

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